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One Roar One Voice Vision

Our vision is a world where humans, animals and nature equally respected, acknowledged and loved; and where we understand that humans are one with animals and nature.

One Roar One Voice Mission

The first part of the One Roar One Voice mission is to create awareness worldwide about the big cat industry, with lions at the forefront. Lions and other big cats are currently being treated as a commodity and being held captive in a horrific industry. It’s time that humanity takes a united stand against animal cruelty and acknowledges and understands the big cats’ importance in the great circle of life.

The second part is to raise funds for the continuation of the campaign; and for the building of a Veterinary Clinic and an Education Centre at Panthera Africa Big Cat Sanctuary in South Africa, as well as more land for future rescues.

We will reach our mission through:

  • The launch of the song We Are One
  • Worldwide media, PR and marketing campaign
  • Awareness and benefit concerts worldwide, first being in Cape Town followed by Geneva, Thailand and London
  • All funds are raised through the sale of the song, concert tickets, One Roar One Voice -merchandise, sponsors and donations
  • Uniting animal welfare organisations, tourism stakeholders, activists and powerful spokespeople worldwide to speak for the big cat industry, in particular the lion industry

The awareness campaign sheds light on the inhumane captive lion industry which consists of different stages; breeding, interaction including cub petting and walking with lions, canned hunting and the bone trade.

Breeding Farms

The 204 South African breeding farms, housing between 8-10 000 captive born lions, argue that they are conserving the wild lion population by letting hunters shoot a captive-bred lion rather than exploiting the threatened wild population. But the numbers speak for themselves as the wild lion population has decreased by over 80% over the last 50 years leaving less than 20 000 lions in the wild. The truth is that the lions (tigers and many other species) are bred for profit, and the money is made by playing on the heartstrings of thousands of volunteers and tourists and making them believe they are part of conservation and making a difference.

Cub Petting

Did you know that the cubs get torn away from the mother so she is left to breed again, whilst the cubs get hand reared for the tourism and hunting industry? The adorable cubs are used as a marketing tool all over the world to attract thousands of tourists and volunteers to interact with them, in order to make them tame to be easily hunted as an adult – either for a trophy or for its body parts. The price to shoot a tame lion and claim its head as a trophy is up to R500 000, which is paid by the many Americans (contributes to over 50% of the lions killed), Europeans and Asians visiting South Africa.

Animal Cruelty in Circuses

There is no wild animal that on its own will want to jump through burning hoops, or sit on a chair, or give a high-5! This comes from years of harsh punishments and beating. The animals have no voice to say no and act out of fear; not choice! There is an absolute need to expose the reality of the psychological and physical agony the animals face under training, housing and transportation. Together with a wealth of international organisations and wildlife activists, Panthera Africa will be part of the solution and save lions and tigers, and through their unique stories create awareness about the truth behind the scenes.

Big Cats Kept As Pets

​Wild animals are surprisingly often kept captive in private homes as “pets.” When in the hands of private individuals, the animals themselves may suffer. There are not enough zoos and accredited institutions to accommodate the number of unwanted “pets”, and as a result, most of these animals are either euthanized, abandoned, or doomed to live in deplorable conditions (source: Born Free USA).

Canned Hunting

​Canned hunting is where the target animal is unfairly prevented from escaping the hunter, either by physical constraints (fencing) or by mental constraints (tame, habituated to humans) – Campaign Against Canned Hunting (CACH)

Bone Trade

Tiger and lion bone trade is the illegal poaching and/or legal breeding of these species to be killed for body parts which are used in Asian traditional medicine. The multibillion-dollar business of buying and selling articles such as fur and bones of protected wildlife, is one of the largest sources of criminal earnings, second to arms smuggling and drug trafficking.

Shani

Shani was the best friend of Cathrine, the founder of Panthera Africa. When Cat was a volunteer in the Free State, she hand-reared Shani as a cub. Like many other volunteers she was led to believe that the cubs were rescued and she was now safe. Nothing could be further from the truth. Shani was carted off to a breeding facility, and after a few years of breeding she was shot and her bones were sold off to be used for potions in the Asian market. Currently the South African government allows 800 lion carcasses per year to be sold in the lion bone trade, which is fuelling the breeding of lions with total disregard of animal welfare.

Jade and Zakara

Did you know that the cubs get torn away from the mother so she is left to breed again, whilst the cubs get hand reared for the tourism and hunting industry? The adorable cubs are used as a marketing tool all over the world to attract thousands of tourists and volunteers to interact with them, in order to make them tame to be easily hunted as an adult – either for a trophy or for its body parts. The price to shoot a tame lion and claim its head as a trophy is up to R500 000, which is paid by the many Americans (contributes to over 50% of the lions killed), Europeans and Asians visiting South Africa.

Baguira

​Baguira was bought by a circus in Argentina and kept in a trailer for 7 years of her life. She never felt grass under her paws, only the cold floor of her trailer which was 1.5 x 2 metres. After 7 years, she was finally rescued by two loving women and after 2 years of searching they found Panthera Africa who welcomed Baguira with open hearts. It was an emotional moment when Baguira put her paw on grass for the first time. But Baguira is lucky as there are thousands of big cats used for entertainment in the big cat industry.

Obi and Oliver

Obi and Oliver grew up in the cub petting industry, being taken away from their mother at a very young age. They were used for tourists and volunteers to interact with, often with up to 70 people per day. When they became too big to be cuddled, they were moved back to the breeding facility they were born. Cathrine and Lizaene, co-founders of Panthera Africa, visited them and discovered terrible conditions. Lions were kept in small enclosures, many malnourished, some with deformities from inbreeding. Obi and Oliver are now living at Panthera Africa in peace and with the love and care they deserve but over 10 000 other lions are still kept in these breeding camps.

Chaka

Did you know that the cubs get torn away from the mother so she is left to breed again, whilst the cubs get hand reared for the tourism and hunting industry? The adorable cubs are used as a marketing tool all over the world to attract thousands of tourists and volunteers to interact with them, in order to make them tame to be easily hunted as an adult – either for a trophy or for its body parts. The price to shoot a tame lion and claim its head as a trophy is up to R500 000, which is paid by the many Americans (contributes to over 50% of the lions killed), Europeans and Asians visiting South Africa.

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